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Contemplative Courses

Here is a brief list of courses involving contemplative practices at SU.
  1. Human Development and Family Science 345: The Developing Infant

    Instructor: Rachel Razza

    In this course, we will discuss pregnancy and development of infants from the prenatal period through age three years. Theories of child development, current research, and practice will be integrated throughout the course to provide a comprehensive understanding of the field.

    Click here for a sample syllabus and more information.

  2. Human Development and Family Science 452/652: Mindfulness in Children and Youth

    Instructor: Rachel Razza

    Course Description: This course provides students with a foundation in mindfulness practice among children and youth. The content focuses on the role of mindfulness in child and youth development and its specific benefits. Current intervention studies (both school and community-based examples) will be reviewed along with information regarding mindful parenting. The goal of the course is to introduce students to theory and practice surrounding mindfulness in children and youth.

    Click here for a sample syllabus and more information.

  3. Communication and Rhetorical Studies 336: Communication and Organizational Diversity

    Instructor: Diane Grimes

    Course Description: Diversity issues in organizations. Self reflection on assumptions about difference. Organizations and differences as communicatively constituted.
    PREREQ: CRS 181

    Click here for a sample syllabus and more information.

  4. Communication and Rhetorical Studies 347: Mindful Communication Skills

    Instructor: Diane Grimes

    Course Description: Develop communication skills including awareness of self-talk, anxiety/stress, listening and speaking habits, and sense of self that create and affect communication patterns. Responding rather than reacting in communication episodes.

    Click here for a sample syllabus and more information.

  5. Communication and Rhetorical Studies 360 002: Mindful Communication Theory

    Instructor: Diane Grimes

    Course Description: The course considers social constructionist communication theory and its relationship to mindfulness. Mindfulness practices encourage reflection on communication patterns, contexts, coordination, coherence, mystery, and the self.

    Click here for a sample syllabus and more information.

  6. Exercise Science M084: Movement Meditation

    Instructor: Dr. Tehmekah MacPherson

    Course Description: Movement Meditation is a physical listening and present moment sensing practice created by Dr. Tehmekah MacPherson designed to nurture internal and external wellness. It fuses embodied symbolism with Eastern influences and indigenous insights -including Afro-derived movement wisdom- in order to encourage balance, connection, and healthy energy flow.

  7. Public Health 405/605: Cognitive Behavioral Stress Reduction

    Instructor: Dr. Dessa Bergen-Cico

    Course Description: Students will learn mindfulness practices for professional self-care and as therapeutic modalities. Examining stressors mindfully through focused attention on the present. Separately observing the mind’s cognitive and emotive reactions to present, past and anticipated events. Additional work required of graduate students.

    Click here for a sample syllabus and more information.

  8. ARI 331: Eye Hand Body Mind

    Instructor: Susan D'Amato [361 Shaffer and 336 Smith; Phone: 443-2251; Email: sdamato@syr.edu]

    Course Description: Drawing lends itself as a holistic process and practice for mindful investigation and engagement with the visual, felt, and perceptive experiences of being alive in the world. This course will integrate traditional and contemporary approaches, materials, and processes in drawing with mindfulness based contemplative practices including breath, voice, movement, yoga, sitting, walking and guided meditation. Structured and open problems will challenge and enrich students’ ability to perceive, create, and think with whole body-mind awareness.  Working from observed, thought-based, and sensational experiences, students will cultivate a daily practice suited to their personal interests while developing a body of work reflective of their process. 

    Click here for a sample syllabus and more information.

  9. Social Work 400/600: Introduction to Equine-Assisted Activities and Therapies

    Instructors: 
    Andrea Colella, Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship, International, Certified Instructor [382-3664; ftgu02@gmail.com]
    Paul Caldwell, MSW, PhD [220 White Hall; 443-5578; pecaldwe@syr.edu]

    Course Description: This course addresses the therapeutic use of horses with children and adults experiencing various physical, cognitive, and emotional challenges. The course also presents the nature of horses as aids to motivation, learning and healing, the research evidence related to the benefits of EAAT, avenues for further education and certifications related to EAAT, and practical aspects of a therapeutic horsemanship program, including safety. The course includes both classroom instruction and experiential learning onsite with an established therapeutic horsemanship program, From the Ground Up (FTGU) Therapeutic Horsemanship, Inc.

  10. Social Work 402: Strategies of Social Work Intervention II

    Instructor: Tracey Marchese, MSW, LCSW-R [282 White Hall; Phone: 443-4879; Email: tmarche@syr.edu]

    Course Description: Design, implementation, and evaluation of intervention strategies in social work practice. Intervention with individuals, families, and groups in the context of agencies, organizations and communities. Concurrent field practicum. 

  11. Social Work 738: Core Concepts in Trauma Treatment with Children and Adolescents

    Instructor: Tracey Marchese, MSW, LCSW-R [282 White Hall; Phone: 443-4879; Email: tmarche@syr.edu]

    Course Description: Introduction of core concepts that inform evidence-based assessment and intervention with traumatized children and adolescents. Addresses the level of functioning of primary caregiving environments and assesses capacity of the community to facilitate restorative processes.

  12. Social Work 781: Alcohol and Other Drugs in Social Work Practice

    Instructor: Paul Caldwell, MSW, PhD [220 White Hall; Phone: 443-5578;  E-mail: pecaldwe@syr.edu]

    Course Description: This course provides relevant theory and skills needed by social workers to address the alcohol and other drug (AOD) problems they will encounter with clients in various practice settings. The course uses lecture, discussion, case study, videos, music, and field experiences to facilitate learning in the following areas: Current theory pertaining to AOD problems, the role of self-help (mutual aid) groups, assessment strategies appropriate to human services settings, motivational enhancement, relapse prevention, family issues, key public policy issues, and the chemical dependency treatment system.  The influence of gender, age, race, disability and sexual orientation on addiction and recovery are also addressed.  In keeping with the "personal awareness" aspect of social work practice, the course involves critical exploration by students of their own attitudes and beliefs regarding AOD.

    Click here for a sample syllabus and more information.

  13. Writing and Rhetoric 400: Rhetorical Listening and Composition

    Instructor: Patrick W. Berry

    Course Description: In Rhetorical Listening and Composition, we will explore how “listening” was erased from the study of rhetoric and writing, how it became something that we do rather than something that we learn to do, and how it might be reconceived as a much-needed type of twenty-first-century literacy. The course is designed to help you develop a historical and theoretical understanding of rhetorical listening. You will partake in inquires that urge cross-cultural dialogue and attend to how issues of class, race, and gender can affect what we see, hear, and write. A central focus of the course is a space that too often remains invisible in public debates, both nationally and globally: the prison-industrial complex.

    Click here for a sample syllabus and more information.

  14. Religious Studies 300.3: Yoga?

    Instructor: Joanne Punzo Waghorne, Professor of Religion (B.A. Religion, Wilson College, MA/Ph.D. History of Religions, South Asian Studies, Divinity School University of Chicago)  [jpwaghor@syr.edu]

    Course Description: What is yoga? Often those in yogic practices declare that yoga is not associated with “religion” but rather either “spiritual” or totally “secular.” This course will consider contemporary yoga now, in the context of its origins in India paying close attention to the ways the human body and the larger cosmos intertwined. The practice of yoga always concerned the re-formation of both mind and body—and included a broad understanding of health-- but in what sense? Here the newer work in cognitive studies, contemplative studies (sometimes called Mindfulness or Wisdom research) will be important.

    Click here for a sample syllabus and more information.