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Disaster Relief Efforts

DISASTER RELIEF EFFORTS

In order to provide an effective response to best support those impacted by recent disasters in North America and the Caribbean, Hendricks Chapel is helping to coordinate a variety of campus-wide efforts.

SERVICE TRIPS

In addition to the various resources listed below, Hendricks Chapel is organizing several initiatives to provide travel for on-hands efforts. For those wishing to learn more, please contact Chaplain Devon Bartholomew at dtbartho@syr.edu or 716-983-7786.

ON-CAMPUS SUPPORT

For those seeking personal assistance, please contact:

Students: Rebecca Reed Kantrowitz, Interim Senior Associate Vice President and Dean, Division of Enrollment and the Student Experience: 315.443.4424

Faculty: LaVonda Reed, Associate Provost for Faculty Affairs: 315.443.5525

Staff: Andrew Gordon, Senior Vice President/Chief Human Resources Officer: 315.443.5459


RESOURCES

The following is an updated list of resources surrounding an assortment of recent relief efforts. Please know that several sources, such as Charity Navigator (https://www.charitynavigator.org), were utilized in the compilation of the following information.

Mexico Earthquake

On September 7th, an 8.1 magnitude earthquake hit Mexico's southern coastline. Infrastructure was severely damaged and over 100 people are reported to have perished as a result.

On September 19th, a 7.1 magnitude earthquake hit Mexico, close to 400 miles away from the previous earthquake's epicenter. Over 200 people have died as a result, leaving it as the deadliest earthquake in over thirty years. In addition to the destruction brought on by both earthquakes, Mexico is also facing severe damage from Hurricane Katia, a Category 1 storm which struck the east coast of Mexico two days after the 8.1 magnitude earthquake.

International Community Foundation: This charity has a long history of service in Mexico, and is raising funds for earthquake relief in a number of different areas in Mexico. You can give here.

Global Giving: A charity crowdfunding site that is attempting to raise $1 million to be used exclusively for local relief and recovery efforts in Mexico. You can give to earthquake relief here.

Oxfam Mexico: The nonprofit is focusing its efforts on relief after the Mexico earthquakes. You can give here.

Red Cross Mexico: You can donate to the victims of the Mexico City earthquake here, as well as the victims of the Chiapas and Oaxaca earthquakes here.

UNICEF Mexico: The United Nations Children's Fund specifically works to support children impacted by natural disasters, including building “child-friendly spaces” after disaster strikes. You can give here.

Hurricanes Maria and Irma

Hurricane Maria made landfall on Dominica during the evening of September 18th as a Category 5 hurricane. With winds of over 150 miles-per-hour, Dominica saw mass destruction of resources.

Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico on September 19th, with heavy storms and flooding that continue to have a massive humanitarian impact.

Hurricane Irma made landfall in Barbuda on September 6th, as a Category 5 hurricane. With winds of over 185 miles per hour and a storm circumference larger than the size of Ohio, Hurricane Irma became the most powerful hurricane to form in the Atlantic Ocean since satellite observation began.

Life-threatening conditions have hit Barbuda and Antigua, Anguilla, St. Martin, St. Marteen, Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, St. Kitts and Nevis, US Virgin Islands, British Virgin Islands, Haiti, Turks and Caicos, the Bahamans, and Cuba.

Hurricane Irma made landfall over the southern Florida mainland around 1 p.m. local time on Sept. 10th as a Category 3 storm, packing winds of more than 110 miles per hour. It moved north, overwhelming the entire state with heavy rains and fierce winds. The storm and its aftermath has killed at least 38 in the Caribbean, 34 in Florida, three in Georgia, four in South Carolina, and one in North Carolina.

ConPRmetidos: The Puerto Rican organization focused on public-private partnership is aiming to raise $150,000 for relief and recovery. You can give here.

American Red Cross: One of the first groups people consider after a disaster, they are providing shelters for those displaced by Irma, and have thousands of volunteers on the ground. You can give here.

Oxfam: The nonprofit is focusing its efforts on the Caribbean islands that were devastated by Irma. You can give here.

Convoy of Hope: The hunger-focused group is sending meals to Haiti. You can give here.

Global Giving: A charity crowdfunding site that is attempting to raise funds to be used exclusively for local relief and recovery efforts. You can give here.

Salvation Army: The Christian charity is emphasizing its intentions to help with long-term recovery. You can give here.

Americares: The nonprofit focused on medicine and health is seeking to provide emergency medical supplies and other basic resources to first responders and others. You can give here.

Volunteer Florida: The state-based group is accepting volunteers and donations. Learn more here.

United Way of Miami-Dade: One of the major local nonprofits that will be working on Irma recovery. You can give here.

South Florida Wildlife Center: The group is centering its efforts on animals affected by the storm. You can give here.

Brigid’s Crossing Foundation: An animal shelter in Naples, Florida. You can give here.

Hurricane Harvey

Hurricane Harvey made landfall on August 25th as the first Category 4 hurricane to hit the United States since Hurricane Charley in 2004.

The storm, which intensified over the Gulf of Mexico before hitting Texas and its surrounding states, brought with it heavy rainfall, damaging winds, and a powerful storm surge. It has significantly impacted communities along the Texas coastline, including Houston, as well as other areas along the Gulf with wind and flood damage.

American Red Cross: Typically one of the first groups people consider after a disaster, they are providing shelters for those displaced by Irma, and have thousands of volunteers on the ground. You can give here.

Global Giving: A charity crowdfunding site that is attempting to raise funds to be used exclusively for local relief and recovery efforts. You can give here.

Foundation Beyond Belief: The humanist group is evaluating how best to use the funds it collects. You can give here.

Salvation Army: The Christian charity is emphasizing its intentions to help with long-term recovery in Houston. You can give here.

Greater Houston Community Fund: A broad-based relief fund established by Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner. You can give here.

Local food banks: The Houston Press has compiled a list of food banks in the affected area, including Houston Food Bank, Galveston County Food Bank, Corpus Christi Food Bank, Southeast Texas Food Bank, and more. They recommend contacting a food bank directly about their need and what you can do.

Houston Humane Society: The group is helping to marshal care and shelter for pets in the area. You can give here. The Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals of Texas is undertaking similar efforts . You can give here. The San Antonio Humane Society is doing the same. More here. There is also Austin Pets Alive, which you can give to here.

Blood donations: The Houston Chronicle noted that Carter BloodCare and the South Texas Blood and Tissue Center are accepting donations.

Americares: The nonprofit focused on medicine and health is seeking to provide emergency medical supplies and other basic resources to first responders and others in Texas. You can give here.

Portlight: A disaster response group dedicated specifically to people with disabilities. It is seeking to help affected people with evacuation and finding shelter, any medical equipment needs they might have, and more. You can learn more about its efforts here.

SBP: The New Orleans-based organization is planning to send AmeriCorps volunteers, assist local leaders and nonprofits, and eventually help rebuild damaged or destroyed homes. You can give here.

PLEASE NOTE: The above listing is by no means exhaustive. If you wish to recommend an organization, or share more about an effort (either on campus or off), that is not listed above, please contact the Office of the Dean at Hendricks Chapel at chapel@syr.edu or by phone at 315.443.2901.